Roadkill paintings

When I was younger I volunteered at an animal hospital for wild animals. I remember that I had loved the work of Audubon since I was a child, and I love wildlife. Many of the animals in the nature hospital died, but retained their animated postures in death. While many survived, I had to get used to taking the ones that didn’t to a deep freezer in the back. Covered in light frost there were herons, deer, raccoons, snakes, owls, foxes, copperheads, and tons of birds. I had never seen such animals up close. Years later, I became fascinated by the mundaity of roadkill despite its grotesque nature. To me the invertible overlaps of common wildlife and man made suburbs was part of my childhood. I grew up with deer living in our sandbox and road kill on the sides of garbage alleys. As a child I was always very delicate and careful with animals, which seems to be at odds with the idea of filming corpses on the side of roads. To be honest, I wanted wildlife to be in my life on a more intimate level and I frequently saw them as alive and animated even after they were dead. I was in high school when I was first introduced to the work of Franz Marc and I was captivated by his depiction of animal forms. For me these influences and this fascination with wildlife led to these paintings.

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